Art Nouveau Weller Umbrella Stand

wellerbaldwinEvery dealer and collector has a soft spot for certain styles and periods of design that is almost a case of love at first sight. In my own case, it was Art Nouveau, a rebirth in design that reigned supreme from about 1895-1910. This Weller “Baldwin” series umbrella stand, with it’s vine like florals and hand-hewn look is a good example of the style produced in North America up until the First World War.

Sam Weller, the founder of Weller pottery, began with the production everyday items such as jars, jugs, tiles and utility pottery. With the move to Zanesville, Ohio, area about 1889, Weller followed the lead of other local potters and began making a line of art pottery.

Weller soon expanded into a line of Portraiture pottery with Indians, animals and themes based on the books by Charles Dickens, called “Dickensware.” A large number of other series wares such as Woodland, Oriental, Hunter, Auroral and Sicardo were also produced and well received at the time.

Like many manufacturers, Weller was forced to scale back production during the years of World War I, and the company concentrated on molded, mass-produced wares similar to those of the Roseville company. Sam Weller died in 1925, when the pottery was being run by his nephew Harry until his own death in 1932. The Weller pottery company survived the Depression and World War II, but it’s glory years were behind it when it closed for good in 1948.

The value for most original Art Nouveau designer pieces has climbed beyond the average collector, but some potteries like Weller automated enough of their production that many examples are still available at reasonable prices today.

If you have a Weller Umbrella Stand and want an Instant Evaluation of it’s current value, we do have reports listing their current Retail and Auction values on file. They’re ready to deliver for $4.95, a very substantial saving over our regular $14.95 appraisals.

Mike Wilcox

Wilcox & Hall Appraisers

Family Folklore

As an Appraiser one hears some pretty amazing stories about items from their owners, like great- great-great Uncle Jack’s sword from Bunker Hill, meat platters that were taken into Kentucky by Daniel Boone and copies of the Constitution found in an old trunk.

Sad to say though, 99 times out of a 100 the “Bunker Hill” sword is from Portugal, the meat platter was made 90 years after Boone shot his last bear, and the long lost copy of Constitution came in a soap box. This might seem discouraging to most, seeing all these relics debunked, but every now and again the real thing shows up.

The funny thing is that it’s not the family relic that turns out to be the most valuable item when doing a house call, in fact it is nearly always some item laying about unnoticed. This is the fun part of it all, is explaining to the home owner that the bowl the dog is eating out of is 19th Century Lambeth Art Pottery or the couch throw the cat is sleeping on is a Indian saddle blanket.

 

If you have a copy of the U.S. Constitution or the Declaration of Independence ( Yes they are all copies) and want an Instant Evaluation of it’s current value, we do have reports listing their current Retail and Auction values on file. They’re ready to deliver for $4.95, a very substantial saving over our regular $14.95 appraisals.

Mike Wilcox

Antique-Appraise.com